Tag Archive | "Christopher Plummer"

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OSCARS 2012: Know Your Nominees:Best Supporting Actor

Posted on 20 February 2012 by William Gatevackes

In the days leading up to the 84th Academy Awards, FilmBuffOnline will be offering profiles on all the nominees in the major categories. Some may be well know, others might be new to you, but if you need a refresher on these talented nominees, here it is.

Kenneth Branagh

Nominated for: Playing noted British thespian Sir Laurence Oliver in My Week with Marilyn.

Other honors for this role:

Nominated, Best Supporting Actor, Washington DC Film Critics Association.

Nominated, Best Supporting Actor, 2012 Critics’ Choice Awards.

Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture, The 69th Annual Golden Globe Awards.

Nominated, Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role, 2012 Screen Actors Guild Award.

Nominated, Best Supporting Actor, 2012 BAFTA Awards.

Where you might know him from:

Many might say that they know him from his work in film adaptations of Shakespeare (Henry V, Much Ado About Nothing, Othello, Hamlet, Love’s Labour Lost), aurguably his most famous role is as Professor Gilderoy Lockhart in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets.

History with Oscar:

Kenneth Branagh has four previous nominations.

1990: Best Actor, Henry V (Lost to Daniel Day-Lewis, My Left Foot).

1990: Best Director, Henry V (Lost to Oliver Stone, Born on the Fourth of July).

1993: Best Short Film, Live Action, Swan Song (Lost to Sam Karmann, Omnibus).

1997: Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published, Hamlet (Lost to Billy Bob Thornton, Sling Blade).

Jonah Hill

Nominated for: Playing Peter Brand, the real-life statistician who help Billy Beane revolutionize baseball in Moneyball.

Other honors for this role:

Nominated, Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture, The 69th Annual Golden Globe Awards.

Nominated, Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role, 2012 Screen Actors Guild Award.

Nominated, Best Supporting Actor, 2012 BAFTA Awards.

Where you might know him from:

Hill is most known for his comedic work, especially his collaborations with Judd Apatow, most notably, Superbad. He was also in Knocked Up, Get Him to the Greek, and The Sitter, and provided voices for animated features such as How to Train Your Dragon  and Megamind.

History with Oscar:

This is Jonah Hill’s first Oscar nomination.

Nick Nolte

Nominated for: playing Paddy Conlon, a recovering alcoholic ex-fighter who trains his estranged son for an MMA tournament in Warrior.

Other honors for this role:

Nominated, Best Supporting Actor, 2012 Critics’ Choice Awards.

Nominated, Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role, 2012 Screen Actors Guild Award.

Where you might know him from:

Nolte’s career spans over forty years, and includes many iconic roles in films such as North Dallas Forty, 48 Hours, Cape Fear and Hulk and the television miniseries, Rich Man, Poor Man.

History with Oscar:

Nick Nolte has two previous nominations.

1992: Best Actor in a Leading Role, The Prince of Tides (Lost to Anthony Hopkins, Silence of the Lambs).

1999: Best Actor in a Leading Role , Affliction (Lost to Roberto Benigni, Life is Beautiful).

Christopher Plummer

Nominated for: playing Hal Fields, a gay man who comes out to his son after his wife’s passing, only to succumb to terminal cancer in Beginners.

Other honors for this role:

Nominated, Best Supporting Actor, Washington DC Film Critics Association Award.

Won, Best Supporting Actor, National Board of Review Awards.

Won, Best Supporting Actor, 37th Annual Los Angeles Film Critics Association Awards.

Won, Best Supporting Actor, 2012 Critics’ Choice Awards.

Won, Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture, The 69th Annual Golden Globe Awards.

Won, Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role, 2012 Screen Actors Guild Award.

Won, Best Supporting Actor, 2012 BAFTA Awards.

Nominated, Best Supporting Male, 2012 Film Independent Spirit Awards.

Where you might know him from:

In his seven decades as a working actor with almost 200 roles to his credit, he has done solid work in many a film, television show, and voice over work. However, his most iconic role would have to be that of Captain Von Trapp in the film version of The Sound of Music.

History with Oscar:

Surprisingly, Christopher Plummer only has one previous nomination.

2010: Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role , The Last Station (Lost to Christoph Waltz, Inglourious Basterds).

Max von Sydow

Nominated for: playing a mute recluse in the film adaptation of Jonathan Safran Foer’s 9/11-themed novel, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close.

Other honors for this role:

von Sydow has not been nominated for any other major award for this role.

Where you might know him from:

Von Sydow’s career has spanned eight decades. He is know in certain circles for his work with Swedish director Ingmar Bergman, but some of his more notable roles are Father Merrin in The Exorcist, and Ming the Merciless in Flash Gordon.

History with Oscar:

Like Christopher Plummer, Max von Sydow only has one previous nomination.

1989: Best Actor in a Leading Role, Pelle the Conqueror (Lost to Dustin Hoffman, Rain Man).

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Oscar 2012: BAFTAs Reaffirm The Favorites—With One Big Exception

Posted on 13 February 2012 by William Gatevackes

Last night, The British Academy of Television and Films Arts gave out their awards. Oscar favorite The Artist took home seven awards, including Picture, Director (Michel Hazanavicius) and Actor (Jean Dujardin). And Oscar favorites Octavia Spencer and Christopher Plummer took home awards for the Supporting categories for their work The Help and Beginners respectively.

These awards aren’t much of a surprise. However, the woman who won Best Actress might throw a spanner in the works of many an Oscar office pool–Meryl Streep took home the award for her role as Margaret Thatcher in The Iron Lady. Viola Davis? Watch out!

It might be easy to write this win off (and her Golden Globe win as well) as the British (and, in the Golden Globe’s case, the international media) honoring Streep for her sterling portrayal of a person who was an iconic figure in European and British history. However, there are a lot of British members in the Academy and Streep holds a lot of respect within the organization. I think that makes it fair to say that the Best Actress Oscar has become a two person race.

Below is a list of the rest of the winners from last night:

Picture

The Artist

Actor

Jean Dujardin – The Artist

Actress

Meryl Streep – The Iron Lady

Director

Michel Hazanavicius – The Artist

Supporting actress

Octavia Spencer – The Help

Supporting actor

Christopher Plummer – Beginners

Animated film

Rango

Documentary

Senna

Outstanding British film

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

Film not in the English language

The Skin I Live In

Outstanding debut

Tyrannosaur

Adapted screenplay

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy – Bridget O’Connor and Peter Straughan

Original screenplay

The Artist – Michel Hazanavicius

Production design

Hugo – Dante Ferretti and Francesca Lo Schiavo

Cinematography

The Artist – Guillaume Schiffman

Makeup and hair

The Iron Lady – Mark Coulier, J. Roy Helland, Marese Langan

Costume design

The Artist – Mark Bridges

Editing

Senna – Gregers Sall and Chris King

Sound

Hugo – Philip Stockton, Eugene Gearty, Tom Fleischman, John Midgley

Original score

The Artist – Ludovic Bource

Rising star award

Adam Deacon

Academy fellowship

Martin Scorsese

Outstanding contribution to British cinema

John Hurt

Special visual effects

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2 – Tim Burke, John Richardson, Greg Butler and David Vickery

Short animation

A Morning Stroll – Grant Orchard and Sue Goffe

Short film

Pitch Black Heist – John Maclean and Geraldine O’Flynn

Via: Guardian

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Oscar Nominations: Who Will Make The Cut?

Posted on 23 January 2012 by William Gatevackes

It’s that time of year again. Tomorrow, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will announce the nominees for the 84st Annual Academy Awards.

Every year there are snubs and surprises, thrills and controversies. There is no way of knowing who will be nominated, especially in a year when the Best Picture nominees could be 5 films, or ten films, or any number in between.  We here at FilmBuffOnLine, who believe the day nominations are announced should be a National holiday, are going to try and handicap the process for you.

We will try to tell you, in the most non-committal way possible, who we think are Almost Certain to get a nomination, who Definite May Be nominated, and whose nomination is a Outside Shot in the major categories (the four acting categories, Best Director, and Best Picture). We are trying to cover all bases, but don’t come to us if you lose money on your Oscar Nomination pool.

Best Actor:

Almost Certain:

George Clooney, The Descendants; Jean Dujardin, The Artist

Definite Maybe:

Michael Fassbender, Jane Eyre, X-Men: First Class, A Dangerous Method or Shame; Leonardo DiCaprio, J Edgar; Brad Pitt, Moneyball

Outside Shot:

Demián Bichir, A Better Life; Ryan Gosling, Crazy, Stupid Love, Drive, or The Ides of March; Gary Oldman, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

Clooney and Dujardin have won the most hardware this year, which not only make them a lock to be nominated, but also likely one of them will be taking home the award.

Fassbender has been great in a lot of films (listing X-Men: First Class was a bit of a joke, he’ll most likely get the nod for Shame, but I think he gave an Oscar worthy performance in that film) so he is practically a lock for a nomination. The next two are about 50/50 of getting in. The Academy seems to have something against DiCaprio, and his performance as J. Edgar Hoover while not horrible (he got a lot of nods for other awards for it), was not amazing enough to overcome that film’s lackluster performance critically or financially. Brad Pitt eked out a couple of wins along the way (most notably, the New York and Boston critics), and while Moneyball was well received, I don’t see it as 100% Oscar material.

If DiCaprio and Pitt don’t get nominated, there are worthy choices waiting to take a spot. Bichir was great in a small film with a limited release that opened over the summer. These all work against him, but he is deserving of a nod. Gosling, like Fassbender, was great in a lot of films this year, and has been nominated before, but none of the films he was in seem to pass Oscar muster. Oldman was flat out amazing in Tinker Tailor, but his subtle performance might be lost on Oscar voters.

Best Actress

Almost Certain:

Viola Davis, The Help;  Meryl Streep, The Iron Lady; Tilda Swinton, We Need to Talk About Kevin; Michelle Williams, My Week with Marilyn

Definite Maybe:

Glenn Close, Albert Nobbs

Outside Shot:

Bérénice Bejo, The Artist; Elizabeth Olsen, Martha Marcy May Marlene; Charlize Theron, Young Adult

On paper, this seems to be the category that seems to have the least wiggle room. Davis, Streep, Close, Swinton and Williams are all in the type of roles that Oscar voters seem to trip over giving nominations to. But in every round of nominations, there are bound to be surprises, and this category is ripe for one.

Bejo and Olsen have the best chance of breaking in, in my opinion. But Bejo is getting pushed for Best Supporting Actress instead of Lead, even though she essentially had a lead role. Olsen got good notices in her role, but suffers from the same “too early/too small handicap” that Bichir has. Theron has received nods for Best Actress in the Golden Globes (where there are nominations for comedy and drama) and the Critic’ Choice Awards (where there are six nominees). She has an Oscar pedigree, but Young Adult could very well be seen as less than Oscar worthy.

Best Supporting Actor:

Almost Certain:

Kenneth Branagh, My Week with Marilyn; Christopher Plummer, Beginners

Definite Maybe:

Albert Brooks, Drive; Jonah Hill, Moneyball

Outside Shot:

Nick Nolte, Warrior; Viggo Mortensen, A Dangerous Method; Andy Serkis, Rise of the Planet of the Apes or The Adventures of Tintin; Armie Hammer, J Edgar; Tom Hardy, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

Plummer has won the Golden Globe and Critic’s Choice award Supporting Actor, making him a lock for an  Oscar nomination, if not the actual award. Branagh has been consistently nominated for his apt portrayal of Laurence Olivier, so he could get the nod as well. Slightly less certain but highly possible are nomination of two actors best known for comedy, Brooks and Hill, for playing against type. After that, place your bets. Will Nolte’s “sports mentor” role make the grade? Will Mortensen’s change of pace role as Sigmund Freud catch the Academy’s attention? Will the Academy make a statement and move towards the future by giving Serkis the nod for his superior motion-capture work? Does the Academy like J Edgar more than the critics and the general public do, thereby swing the nod to Hammer? Will Hardy represent Tinker Tailor‘s stellar cast with a nomination? Will it be another cast member? Or will the film be ignored?

Best Supporting Actress

Almost Certain:

Octavia Spencer, The Help; Bérénice Bejo, The Artist

Definite Maybe:

Melissa McCarthy, Bridesmaids

Outside Shot:

Jessica Chastain, The Help or Take Shelter; Janet McTeer, Albert Nobbs; Carey Mulligan, Shame; Shailene Woodley, The Descendants

What I said for Christopher Plummer above also applies to Spencer. The only chance Bejo doesn’t get nominated here is if she gets nominated for Best Actress. But that race is crowded so I think she’ll land here. She is deserving.

The only thing keeping me from making McCarthy almost certain is the Academy’s apparent hatred of the comedy. They do not like to give nominations from comedies, no matter how good the role or film is. This time, though, I think they’ll make an exception.

After that, pick two. Chastain and Woodley might have a slight advantage, but McTeer has a good chance and Mulligan could sneak in.

Best Director:

Almost Certain:

Michel Hazanavicius, The Artist; Martin Scorsese, Hugo

Definite Maybe:

Woody Allen, Midnight in Paris;  Alexander Payne, The Descendants

Outside Shot:

David Fincher, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo; Terrence Malick, The Tree of Life; Bennett Miller, Moneyball; Steven Spielberg, War Horse or The Adventures of Tintin; Tate Taylor, The Help

Hazanavicius is definitely most deserving and Scorsese won the Golden Globe, so they should both be nominated. After that, Payne is almost a lock, as is Allen, due to the number of nominations they received. After that, well, ot depends. Fincher got a Directors Guild nomination, Malick has been on a lot of west coast critics awards list, which might be a barometer of how the Academy will go. Miller might ride the surprising accolades Moneyball is getting this award season with a nomination. And months ago, it looked like it wouldn’t be a question if Spielberg would be nominated, but for which film. Now, here he is, a long shot for any nomination at all. Weird. And Taylor has to be consider taking into account the number of great performance that came from that film.

Best Picture:

Almost Certain:

The Artist; The Descendants

Definite Maybe:

Hugo; The Help ; Midnight in Paris

Outside Chance:

The Tree of Life; War Horse; Moneyball; The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo; The Adventures of Tintin; Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy or just about any other film out there that has a miniscule amount of buzz.

Not having a definite number of nominees beforehand really plays havoc with the prognosticating business. I tried to pick out the five most likely films to get nominated, but with the possibility of five more, well, it could be any film of a certain stature.

So, what do you think? Am I on to something, or totally wrong? I guess we’ll find out tomorrow.

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Plummer Joins DRAGON TATTOO Remake

Posted on 30 September 2010 by Rich Drees

Christopher Plummer has joined the cast of David Fincher’s adaptation of Stig Larsson’s novel The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo.

Plummer will be playing Henrik Vanger, the man who hires disgraced journalist Mikael Blomkvist (Daniel Craig) to investigate the disappearance of his beloved great-niece who vanished four decades earlier. Oddly, Max Von Sydow had been previously linked to the role and there seems to be no word as to why he no longer is.

The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo starts shooting later this year for a December 21, 2011 release.

Via The Hollywood Reporter.

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Oscar Nominations Post-Mortem: How Did We Do?

Posted on 02 February 2010 by William Gatevackes

On Friday, we here at FilmBuffOnline handicapped the Oscar race as we saw it. As we all know, the nominations have just been released. How did we do?  Well, let’s find out. And the nominees are…

Actor in a Leading Role

  • Jeff Bridges in Crazy Heart
  • George Clooney in Up in the Air
  • Colin Firth in A Single Man
  • Morgan Freeman in Invictus
  • Jeremy Renner in The Hurt Locker

Number of Nominations We “Called”: 5 out of 5.

Commentary: It wasn’t too hard to get 100% correct when four of the five were gimmies. Morgan Freeman played a real-life inspirational hero, and most years that will be enough to get you the nod.

Actor in a Supporting Role

  • Matt Damon in Invictus
  • Woody Harrelson in The Messenger
  • Christopher Plummer in The Last Station
  • Stanley Tucci in The Lovely Bones
  • Christoph Waltz in Inglourious Basterds

Number of Nominations We “Called”: 5 out of 5.

Commentary: Again, with a perfect record, if you count picking Plummer as an outside shot as a prediction. Of course, the “playing a real-life person” factor and the “legend at in the winter of his career” factor was enough to give Christopher Plummer his first Oscar nomination. Conventional wisdom says this statue is Christoph Waltz’s to lose, but I’m getting a feeling that Plummer could spoil, especially if he gets the “here’s a statue for lifetime achievement ” sympathy vote.

Actress in a Leading Role

  • Sandra Bullock in The Blind Side
  • Helen Mirren in The Last Station
  • Carey Mulligan in An Education
  • Gabourey Sidibe in Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire
  • Meryl Streep in Julie & Julia

Number of Nominations We “Called”: 5 of 5.

Commentary: Another clean sweep! This is our best year ever! Up into this category at least!

And I totally don’t believe this story about Sandra Bullock not expecting a phone call telling her she was nominated. She’s the favorite to win the whole thing! Pretending to be humble only works if, well, you need to be.

Actress in a Supporting Role

  • Penélope Cruz in Nine
  • Vera Farmiga in Up in the Air
  • Maggie Gyllenhaal in Crazy Heart
  • Anna Kendrick in Up in the Air
  • Mo’Nique in Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire

Number of Nominations We “Called”: 4 of 5.

Commentary: The first surprise of the nominations, as Maggie Gyllenhall gets the honor of losing to Mo’Nique on Oscar night. So left fied was this that I picked Mariah Carey over her as a possible candidate. Crazy Heart seemed to be a Jeff Bridges vehicle all along, but I guess the Academy thought Gyllenhaal was worth a nod.

Directing

  • Avatar – James Cameron
  • The Hurt Locker– Kathryn Bigelow
  • Inglourious Basterds– Quentin Tarantino
  • Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire – Lee Daniels
  • Up in the Air– Jason Reitman

Number of Nominations We “Called”: 5 of 5.

Commentary: Again, a very predictable category. And , since there are 10 nominees for Best Picture, all five of the director’s films are nominated for Best Picture, avoiding the reoccurring controversy of one of a director being snubbed. Of course, to look at it another way, now there are five directors being snubbed.

Best Picture

  • Avatar – James Cameron and Jon Landau, Producers
  • The Blind Side – Nominees to be determined
  • District 9– Peter Jackson and Carolynne Cunningham, Producers
  • An Education– Finola Dwyer and Amanda Posey, Producers
  • The Hurt Locker – Nominees to be determined
  • Inglourious Basterds – Lawrence Bender, Producer
  • Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire– Lee Daniels, Sarah Siegel-Magness and Gary Magness, Producers
  • A Serious Man– Joel Coen and Ethan Coen, Producers
  • Up – Jonas Rivera, Producer
  • Up in the Air– Daniel Dubiecki, Ivan Reitman and Jason Reitman, Producers

Number of Nominations We “Called”: 10 of 10.

Commentary: 100% correct, even if we thought that The Blind Side, District 9, and A Serious Man were long shots. I’m happy that the Academy gave a nod to the genre flick District 9. I’m very happy that Up got a nods. There would have been a rant if it wasn’t in the list. I think it deserved a spot even if there were only five spaces.

The Blind Side is listed by many as a surprise, but, really, there was enough Oscar buzz around it that I included it as having a chance on my list. What is surprising is that such a poorly received film got a nomination. The film received a 70% positive rating at the movie review aggregatesite, Rotten Tomatoes. That did qualify it as “Fresh,” or recommended, by the site, but was only 11 percentage points away from being classified “Rotten,” or not recommended. Of all the possible candidates I listed on Friday, only Nine scored lower (and abysmal 37% positive rating). All the other films listed scored at least five percentage points higher.

This is indicative of the axiom, the more things change, the more they stay the same. The field was extended to 10 films to put to rest the controversy about good films not getting nominated. But a good number of critically acclaimed films didn’t make the cut, but the treacly, feel-good, factually inaccurate film did. If they keep this up, maybe the Academy should expand the nominees to 20.

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Oscar Nominations: Who Will Make The Cut

Posted on 29 January 2010 by William Gatevackes

It’s that time of year again. This Tuesday, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will announce the nominees for the 82nd Annual Academy Awards.

Every year there are snubs and surprises, thrills and controversies. There is no way of knowing who will be nominated, but we here at FilmBuffOnLine, who believe the day nominations are announced should be a National holiday, are going to try and handicap the process for you.

We will try to tell you who we think are Almost Certain to get a nomination, who Definite May Be nominated, and whose nomination is a Outside Shot in the major categories (the four acting categories, Best Director, and Best Picture). We are trying to cover all bases, but don’t come to us if you lose money on your Oscar Nomination pool.

Best Actor:

Almost Certain:

Jeff Bridges, Crazy Heart; George Clooney, Up in the Air; Colin Firth, A Single Man;  Jeremy Renner, The Hurt Locker

Definite May Be:

Morgan Freeman, Invictus;

Outside Shot:

Robert Downey Jr, Sherlock Holmes; Matt Damon, The Informant!; Tobey Maguire, Brothers

Four of the five spots should be locked up, as Clooney, Firth, Bridges, and Renner have been nominated for all the other awards this season and have pretty much split up the winnings. Freeman should be nominated, but could also have some backlash headed his way. Downey Jr. won the Golden Globe for comedy acting, and there is some buzz for Damon.

Best Actress:

Almost Certain:

Sandra Bullock, The Blindside; Gabourey Sidibe, Precious: Based on the Novel “Push” by Sapphire; Meryl Streep, Julie and Julia

Definite May Be:

Helen Mirren, The Last Station; Carey Mulligan, An Education

Outside Shot:

Amy Adams, Julie and Julia; Emily Blunt, The Young Victoria; Ellen Page, Whip It; Hilary Swank, Amelia

Bullock seems to have set off a siren with critics and her fellow actors as per her acting ability. Sidibe’s debut won raves and that should make her a lock for a nomination, Mulligan has won her fair share of awards, but will Oscar nominate two relative unknowns in the same year? The Academy should just make a rule that Streep is automatically nominated whenever she puts a movie out. Julia and Julia seem more Oscar worthy than It’s Complicated. But I wouldn’t be surprised if her co-star from the former gets a nod. Amelia was a poorly received Oscar bait, but the Academy seems to like Swank.

Best Supporting Actor:

Almost Certain:

Christoph Waltz,Inglourious Basterds

Definite May Be:

Matt Damon, Invictus; Woody Harrelson, The Messenger; Stanley Tucci, The Lovely Bones

Outside Shot:

Ben Foster, The Messenger; Christian McKay, Me and Orson Welles; Christopher Plummer, The Last Station

It’s Waltz’s Oscar to lose, so he’s pretty much guaranteed a nomination. Damon, Harrelson and Tucci have received enough acclaim elsewhere that they should be nominated. Plummer has received a number of nominations, but Foster and especially McKay were strong in their roles and could surprise.

Best Supporting Actress:

Almost Certain:

Mo’Nique, Precious: Based on the Novel “Push” by Sapphire

Definite May Be:

Penelope Cruz, Nine; Vera Fermiga, Up in the Air; Anna Kendrick, Up in the Air; Samantha Morton, The Messenger

Outside Shot:

Mariah Carey, Precious: Based on the Novel “Push” by Sapphire; Diane Krueger, Inglourius Basterds; Julianne Moore, A Single Man; Sigourney Weaver, Avatar

Like Supporting Actor, Mo’Nique is enough of a front runner that a nod is a given. However, her performance isn’t the only surprisingly good one in the film, so a nod for Mariah Carey is not outside the realm of possibility. Both women from Up in the Air should be nominated, but Kendrick has the edge if they only choose one. The Academy loves Cruz, so she should get a nomination for a poorly received movie. And I can’t see Avatar not getting one acting nod, and the most likely candidate is Weaver.

Best Director:

Almost Certain:

Kathryn Bigelow, The Hurt Locker; James Cameron, Avatar; Jason Reitman, Up in the Air

Definite May Be:

Lee Daniels, Precious: Based on the Novel “Push” by Sapphire; Clint Eastwood, Invictus; Quentin Tarantino, Inglourious Basterds

Outside Shot:

Tom Ford, A Single Man; Pete Docter & Bob Petersen, Up

The big three of Bigelow, Cameron (who were once married to each other–keep an eye on each other’s face if the other wins) and Reitman should get nods. Daniels and Tarantino have other nominations to their credit and the Academy loves Eastwood. But Docter and Petersen are more than worthy.

Best Picture:

Almost Certain:

Avatar, The Hurt Locker, Precious: Based on the Novel “Push” by Sapphire, Up in the Air

Definite May Be:

An Education, Inglourious Basterds, Invictus, A Single Man, Up

Outside Shot:

(500) Days of Summer, The Blindside, Crazy Heart, District 9, The Fantastic Mr. Fox, The Hangover, Julie and Julia, The Messenger, Nine, A Serious Man, Star Trek, The Young Victoria

Since this is the first time in decades that more than five films will be nominated for Best Picture, this has become one of the most unpredictable categories. Any film nominated for Best Director should have a good chance at making the ten, but what about sci-blockbusters like Star Trek and District 9? How about comedies like The Hangover? Do poorly received films like Nine and The Blindside have a chance? This all adds up to a test year for the new system and the list of nominees being anybody’s guess.

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UK Gets Stunning PARNASSUS Poster

Posted on 14 October 2009 by Rich Drees

Terry Gilliam’s The Imaginarium Of Doctor Parnassus opens in the UK on Friday, and those lucky Britishers have gotten one last poster for the film. This one features Lily Cole, who as Parnassus’s daughter is caught up in a wager between her father (Christopher Plummer) and the Devil (Tom Waits). Click on the poster for a much bigger view, there’s a lot going on in this poster. We in the States will have to wait until Christmas Day for the film to open.

DoctorParnassusPoster

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